Courses

SOCI 100 / INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

Introduces basic concepts, methods and approaches to the study of society. Focuses on social, cultural, and political systems and structures, social conflict and social institutions. Topics include family, education, gender, race and ethnicity, social class, the economy, organizations, social groups, aging and generations.
Credits: 3

SOCI 201 / SCIENTIFIC METHODS IN BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Research process and basic research concepts; critical framework to examine social science problems and evaluate research; constructing social explanations; concept of causality; measurement, sampling, questionnaire construction; experimental methodology, ethnomethodology, document study; philosophy of social science.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOCI. 100 or SOCI.101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103

SOCI 202 / SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Examines the concept of culture and cultural change. Discusses how social anthropology can aid in understanding diverse cultures. Focuses on several major themes in social anthropology such as family, kinship, gender, race, language, economy, religion, globalization, and health and illness.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 204 / SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

Focuses on the historical transformation of the concept of culture, and various theoretical and conceptual perspectives for studying culture. Analyzes both the social production and reproduction of culture and cultural foundations of stratification.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 205 / SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Critically examines a range of social problems facing modern societies from a sociological perspective. The course will highlight the causes and consequences of social problems, how societies respond to them, and the policy implications of the sociological approach. Possible topics include crime, racism, poverty, global inequality, environmental degradation, and war.
Credits: 3

SOCI 207 / SOCIOLOGY OF EMOTIONS

Explores the social side of emotions, including how they are socially shaped, learned, regulated, controlled, and patterned. Critically analyzes debates about the changing role of emotions in social, economic and political life.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 208 / FAMILY STUDIES AND THE TURKISH FAMILY

Students will develop an understanding of the family as a social institution and as a context in which individuals develop, make choices, and influence each other. The course will introduce the students to how social scientists understand and study the family. Today's most pertinent family issues are discussed such as dating, sex, cross-gender relationships, marriage, divorce, parenting, family violence, and family law.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103 or PSYC. 100

SOCI 210 / LABOR HISTORY OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE&EARLY REPUBLIC TURKEY

The period between the destruction of the Janissaries in 1826 and the end of single party rule in Turkey in 1950. Different theoretical approaches to labor history, artisans’ experience with the Industrial Revolution, the making of an industrial labor force, ethnic and gendered segmentations among workers, state and labor relations, and different labor migration patterns.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 211 / SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER

This course examines gender as a major organizing principle in social life. Particularly, it focuses on how gender identities are socially constructed and how gender intersects with ethnicity, nationalism, class, sexuality, age and other dimensions of identity and social inequality. It also investigates the roles of family, education, the media, politics, economics and religion in shaping gender identities and inequalities.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 212 / SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

Inequalities based on socio-economic class, gender, and ethnicity; historical and contemporary debates in social stratification; approaches in understanding and conceptualizing different forms of stratification. Readings also focus on sites of conflict and resistance; ways different groups in society deal with forms of inequality.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 220 / SOCIAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT

Examines large-scale social transformations shaping the contemporary world, including the rise of the West, colonialism, the emergence of the Third World, the history of the development project and globalization. Explores the causes and consequences of inequalities among countries, as well as gender, class, ethnic and regional inequalities within countries.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 301 / RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY

Advanced design issues related to empirical sociological research are presented. These include conceptualization, hypothesis formulation, study design, sample design, sample size determination, data collection strategies, data analysis, interpretation of statistical findings, and drawing social and policy relevant conclusions. Students conduct their own research projects and present results orally and in written form.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite: (SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103) and SOCI. 201 and MATH. 202

SOCI 302 / SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS

Discusses the development of modern organizations and bureaucracies, and the deviations from the bureaucratic model with a focus on business organizations. Also provides an introduction to the sociology of work. Focuses on labor control, labor process, gender relations and the transformation of the structure of employment in industrial and service sectors.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 303 / CLASICAL SOCIAL THEORY

Examines the works of major classical sociological theorists such as Marx, Durkheim, Weber and Simmel. Discusses twentieth-century perspectives that build on classical theory (such as structural functionalism). Also explores the contemporary challenges to classical theory such as feminism, postcolonialism and poststructuralism.
Credits: 3

SOCI 304 / SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS

Examines the social, economic, cultural and political forces that affect health and illness. Discusses individual experience and narratives of illness, the conceptualization of health and illness in hospitals and institutions and the political economy of health care. Focuses on the creation of medical knowledge, lay-professional interaction, inequalities in health and healthcare and health-related social movements.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 305 / SOCIOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

Focuses on micro-sociological perspectives that approach society in bottom-up ways. Discusses our taken-for-granted and seemingly private experiences in everyday life and explores the ways in which larger forces and processes, such as gender, race, ethnicity, and class, are intertwined with the micro processes.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 309 / ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY

Discusses the social relations and social structures within which economic action takes place. Focuses on the social networks and institutions that underlie market exchange and pre-market and pre-modern economic institutions. Examines different modes of state regulation of the economy, corruption and fraud, and social and economic institutions for preventing corruption and fraud.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: (SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103) or consent of the instructor

SOCI 310 / LAW AND SOCIETY

Examines law as a mechanism of social regulation and a field of knowledge. Discusses the social construction of crime and criminals. Studies the interaction between class, gender and ethnicity in the judicial system.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 311 / SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

Examines the relationship between the educational system and the reproduction of existing inequalities in societies. Focuses on social mobility, stratification and social reproduction as these relate to education. Topics include social capital, teaching as a profession, school choice, school dropouts, vocational education and higher education. Examines the interaction between education and ethnicity, class, and gender.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 312 / CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

Explores critical theory, neofunctionalist theory, theories on structure and agency, microsociological perspectives, postmodern theory and poststructuralism. Discusses identity politics and difference as framed by postcolonial and feminist theories.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 and SOCI. 303 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 313 / TURKISH SOCIETY IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

Compares Turkish social structures since the 1920s to other societies. Topics include constitutional structures, development of the civil society, economic policies and their impact on rural-urban differentiation, the impact of trends in international development on the environment and income distribution, Istanbul as a global city, gender and ethnicity with respect to economic, political, and social rights.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 314 / INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

Main approaches to various institutions and actors that make up the field of international political economy. Question of who gets what at a global level from a multi-actored, multi-level and multi-disciplinary perspective. Interactions between states, markets, firms, NGOs, and not-for-profit organizations at the local, national, regional, and supranational levels. Global trade, production, finance, and knowledge structures and relations in the context of international organizations, transnational corporations, global financial structures, regional integrations, North-South relations, discourses and practices of development, and problems of global poverty.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 315 / URBAN SOCIOLOGY

Reviews developments in urban theory and the history of urbanization. Discusses urban trends with special attention to the impact of globalization on cities. Themes include urban regeneration processes, urban poverty, spatial segregation, and urban social movements. Focuses on case studies from Turkey and diverse geographical settings around the world.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 320 / ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY

Focuses on cultural, economic and political discourses involved in shaping the definitions of environmental problems. Highlights some of the roots of current-day ecological issues with a specific focus on globalization. Examines environmental justice and the environmentalist movement.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 321 / SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Designed to introduce students to the sociological study of social movements in historical and comparative perspective. By focusing on some of the key theories that explain the origins, tactics, and success of social movements, the course examines how political, ideological, economic, organizational, and cultural factors shape social movement emergence and development as well as the diverse ways in which social movements affect political and social change.
Credits: 3

SOCI 326 / GENDER AND POLITICS

This undergraduate seminar critically explores a variety of political, social, and economic processes through a gendered perspective. The class revisits issues of politics and political economy by focusing on various inequalities that govern the lives of men and women in their everyday lives. The course material is organized so that we discuss themes such as, but not limited to, nation-state formation, citizenship, labor, and development.
Credits: 3

SOCI 340 / SOCIOLOGY OF CRIME AND DEVIANCE

Introduces students to the sociological study of crime and deviance. The course explores some of the most prominent sociological theories of crime and deviance, and the current research on deviance in contemporary societies, and focuses on various instances of rule-making, rule-enforcing, and rule-breaking, such as criminal violence, illicit drugs, and mental disorders.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 350 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY I

Detailed examination of topics in Sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 351 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY II

Detailed examination of topics in Sociology.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOCI. 100

SOCI 352 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY II

Detailed examination of topics in Sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 354 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY

Detailed examination of topics in Sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 357 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY

Detailed examination of topics in Sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 358 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY


Credits: 3

SOCI 390 / INDEPENDENT STUDY I

Investigation of one or more topics of interest with the guidance of an instructor. Presentation of a research proposal at the end of the term.
Credits: 3

SOCI 395 / INDEPENDENT STUDY

Investigation of one or more topics of interest with the guidance of an instructor. Presentation of a research proposal at the end of the term.
Credits: 1.5

SOCI 402 / SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNICATİON AND INFORMATION

Examination of the sociology of the communicator, audience, content, effects, flow and diffusion research, and communication as a social process. The role of communication and information technology, relations between economics, technology, power, & culture.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ((SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103) and (SOCI. 201 or SOCI. 202 or SOCI. 204 or SOCI. 206 or SOCI. 208)) or consent of the instructor

SOCI 403 / SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY

Focuses on the social forces that shape the body, instead of looking at it as a biological fact. Topics include how the body is socially constructed, how these constructions influence our bodily experience, the relationship between the body and the rise of consumer culture, developments in technology and changes in the healthcare system. Discusses the impact of these developments on aging, disabled, sexualized and racialized bodies
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 404 / QUALITATIVE METHODS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

This course examines qualitative methods used in social science research, focusing primarily on participant-observation, on asking questions, on writing fieldnotes, and on the transformation of these primary field data into written ethnographic documents. Course readings on specific research methods will contribute to the formulation of a simple research project to be carried out during the semester. Literature on the theoretical and ethical aspects of these methods will also be considered.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ((SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103) and (SOCI. 201 or SOCI. 202 or SOCI. 204 or SOCI. 206 or SOCI. 208)) or consent of the instructor

SOCI 405 / Science, Technology and Society

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues in the study of science and technology. Focuses on the reciprocal ways in which science and technology shape society and the ways in which society shapes science and technology. Employs a multidisciplinary point of view in the social sciences and humanities and asks philosophical (how to define science and technology?), sociological (how does science and technology interact with social categories, such as gender and race), historical (how does the historical development of science and technology inform them today? How do past debates matter?), and political (how does power matter in the practice of science and technology? How should science and technology be controlled democratically?) questions.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: (SOCI. 100 or SOCI. 101 or SOCI. 102 or SOCI. 103) or consent of the instructor

SOCI 406 / ECONOMY, SOCIETY AND, POLITICS IN ASIA

Examination of economic, social, and political change in major Asian countries from the nineteenth century up until today from a comparative and historical perspective. Discussion of capitalism, modernization, colonialism, nationalism, socialism, developmentalism, and neoliberalism with reference to the experiences of China, India, Japan, (North and South) Korea, and other countries.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or HIST 103 or Consent of the Instructor

SOCI 407 / State and Society in Latin America

Examines historical and contemporary political processes and structures in Latin American societies. Focuses on Latin American class and political structures. Includes topics such as colonization and independence of Latin American countries, post-independence economic development, populism, military dictatorship, debt crisis, neoliberalism and globalization.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 409 / MEDIA AND IDENTITY

Images of race, ethnicity and gender in media and particularly the ways in which gender, ethnicity and race are constructed and represented in different communication contexts, the reproduction of prejudice and discrimination, media policy, structural factors associated with inequalities regarding access to media, and information, communication and media policy.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 410 / HISTORY OF IDEOLOGIES : NATIONALISM, SOCIALISM AND FASCISM

Deals with ideologies such as Marxism, Fascism, Liberalism & Social Democracy. This course also compares nationalism in European and non-European countries.
Credits: 3

SOCI 411 / SOCIOLOGY OF MIGRATION

Presents and discusses major sociological dimensions of migration.Examines reasons of migration, different categories of migrants, theories of international migration, socio-economic implications migration flows.Analyzes concepts closely related with sociology of migration, such as race, class, ethnicity, gender, diaspora formation, transnationalism, identity and belonging, integration, and social exclusion.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 412 / VIDEO GAME STUDIES

Reviews the field of digital game studies and historically situates the emergence of video games as a medium. Explores the theoretical landscape of contemporary game studies; focuses on topics such as video game theory, political economy and space, video game labor, race, gender, sexuality, design and software, globalisation, pedagogy, resistance, aesthetics, and research methods.
Credits: 3

SOCI 413 / COMPARATIVE STUDY OF REVOLUTIONS

Main theoretical perspectives on social and political revolutions, comparing historical examples such as the French, American, Russian and Iranian Revolutions.
Credits: 3

SOCI 421 / POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY

Examines the nature of political power, dynamics of political change, historical development and the nature of political institutions. Discusses the social foundations of state and state-society relations.
Credits: 3
SOCI. 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 432 / CULTURE AND BEHAVIOR

An examination of psychological processes in cultural context. The self and the family, cognition, social behavior, organizational behavior and work values from a cross-cultural perspective.
Credits: 3
Prerequisite: PSYC. 100 or SOCI. 100 or PSYC. 204 or SOCI. 206 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 448 / THE MIDDLE EAST IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD

Contemporary realities of societies and politics of the Middle East and North Africa as part of worldwide ties and exchanges. An examination of alternative ways to study the region and its recent history, concentrating on the post-World War II period. A variety of discourses and practices such as those on citizenship, rights, national identity, religion, gender, transnational migrations, social movements, economic development, and urban transformations.
Credits: 3

SOCI 450 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY I

Detailed examination of current topics in sociology.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or consent of the instructor

SOCI 451 / SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY II

Detailed examination of current topics in sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 490 / INDEPENDENT STUDY II

Work on the research proposal resulting from SOCI 390 with the guidance of an instructor, culminating in a research paper suitable for presentation or publication.
Credits: 3

SOCI 495 / INDEPENDENT STUDY


Credits: 1.5

SOCI 501 / QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Examines quantitative methods such as inferential statistics, regression analysis, survey methods in an applied way. Students use a number of quantitative data sets throughout the class to familiarize themselves with sociological methods. Research and publication ethics.
Credits: 3

SOCI 502 / QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Examines the basic qualitative research methods used in sociological research with their weaknesses and strengths. Course covers qualitative data collection methods, ethnography, interview techniques, archive research methods, oral history, and document analysis methods.
Credits: 3

SOCI 503 / CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORY

Closely examines the basic themes and the most important figures of classical sociological theory. Course analyzes in detail the work of Marx, Weber and Durkheim, which constitutes the classical roots of sociological theory and helps students develop a sociological perspective through extensive theoretical discussions.
Credits: 3

SOCI 504 / HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY

Some of the most important theoretical questions of the social sciences have been posed by scholars pursuing investigations at the intersection of sociology and history. How are these questions formulated and answered? How important is a consideration of the temporal nature of human actions and social structures and what are its consequences for our understanding of social life? How does the past "matter" to the present? This course addresses these questions and introduces students to some key theories, methodological contributions and a selection of substantive themes in comparative and historical sociology.
Credits: 3

SOCI 506 / CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORY

Examines contemporary theoretical approaches that emerged after the Second World War as a follow up to classical sociological theories. Course presents different theoretical approaches including structuralism, post-structuralism, post-modernism, feminism, post-Marxism, and subaltern studies, by reading and discussing the work of most important figures of these fields.
Credits: 3

SOCI 509 / RESEARCH METHODS AND DESIGN

ntroduces the fundamentals of historical and social research by focusing on a variety of research methods. In this modular course, students are first exposed to the philosophy of social science methodology and quantitative research methods. Then they are introduced to historical, sociological, and comparative methods, including oral history, ethnography, interviewing techniques, archival research and document analysis. Building on their training in these methods, the course also will guide students through the steps of research design, namely writing research proposals, constructing hypotheses, operationalizing research questions, designing questionnaires and interview forms, and data collection
Credits: 3

SOCI 511 / SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

Introduces students to the major theories and empirical trends in social stratification. Examines dimensions of social inequalities and stratification, such as class, race, ethnicity and gender from a comparative, historical, and global perspective.
Credits: 3

SOCI 513 / SOCIAL WELFARE&SOCIAL POL

Traces the evolution of notions of social welfare, social justice and social policy from their advent in European and North American societies to the current scholarly and policy debates in developing countries. Examines the development of social welfare systems and the underlying philosophies in the context of the social, economic, political, and cultural environments in which they emerged. Topics include the evolution of modern conceptions of the "welfare state," and the role of public, private and voluntary sectors in the social services. Policy making procedures, the role of the respective policy actors and the effects of social policy measures will also be examined in terms of social participation, social inclusion and (re)distribution of income and services.
Credits: 3

SOCI 516 / NATIONS AND NATIONALISM

Examines ideas of nationalism, nations and nation-states, and the different ways in which nationalism is practiced and expressed, and the major theoretical works on these concepts.
Credits: 3

SOCI 518 / COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON THE STATE

Offers a comparative perspective on issues of state-society relations in the context of theories of state formation, and state intervention in economic development. By moving back and forth between western and non-western models of state formation and development, the course tries to refine as well as to build upon the current state literature in both sociology and political science.
Credits: 3

SOCI 521 / COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON THE MIDDLE EAST

Analyzes the establishment and development of Middle Eastern political systems, social and political processes including the end of empires, formation of nation states, and their foreign policies beginning with the nineteenth century.
Credits: 3

SOCI 524 / ETATIST POLICIES IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

Examines state-oriented policies in general in Eastern Europe including the Soviet Union and Balkan countries, comparing these countries to Turkey. Deals with different economic policies in those countries during the 20th century. Explores the effects of etatist economies on the political transformations in these societies.
Credits: 3

SOCI 538 / SOCI & POL MOVEMENTS

Engages some of the theoretical perspectives, conceptual issues/questions, and empirical research that animate the study of social movements and collective action. It will look into the individual and collective involvement in social movements, as well as examine the social and political context of collective action. How and why do social movements emerge? How are social movements organized? How do activists choose political tactics and strategies? What are, if any, the effects of social movements on processes of social and political change?
Credits: 3

SOCI 541 / MIGRATION AND POPULATION MOVEMENTS

Provides an advanced survey of scholarly literatures on migration and population movements. Covers theories of and empirical studies about international migration, transnational migration and diaspora formation, refugee movements and internal displacement.
Credits: 3

SOCI 561 / ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY

Covers the fields of classical and new economic sociology. Introduces the classical theoretical perspectives of Adam Smith, Max Weber and Karl Polanyi as well as recent conceptual debates about the character of markets, the informal economy, ethnic economies and networks.
Credits: 3

SOCI 570 / GENDER INEQUALITIES

Provides students with a background in the historical roots of gender inequalities in the society, the economic and ideological factors that contributed to the emergence of contemporary forms of gender inequalities. Establishes the micro and macro processes that contribute to the perpetuation of gender inequalities. Surveys, evaluates and compares macro level policies and micro level interventions that have targeted remediation of gender inequalities.
Credits: 3

SOCI 573 / Sociology of Health and Ilness

Examines the social, economic, cultural and political forces that affect health and illness. Discusses individual experience and narratives of illness, the conceptualization of health and illness in hospitals and institutions and the political economy of health care. Focuses on the creation of medical knowledge, lay-professional interaction, inequalities in health and healthcare and health-related social movements.
Credits: 3

SOCI 574 / CRIME AND DEVIANCE

Introduces students to social deviance, explores some of the most prominent and important sociological theories of deviance, and reviews the current research on deviance in contemporary society. Offers a comparative perspective on crime and deviance, distribution of power and structures of inequality in the conceptualizations of deviance, and cultural definitions of morality and deviant behavior.
Credits: 3

SOCI 590 / SEMINAR

Helps students learn how dissertation research is conducted and how the writing process continues. The goal of the course is to secure guidance from faculty members in advisor and dissertation topic selection and the formulation of research questions and methodology.
Credits: 0

SOCI 621 / POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY

Examines the nature of political power, dynamics of political change, historical development and the nature of political institutions. Discusses the social foundations of state and state-society relations.
Credits: 3

SOCI 695 / PHD THESIS


Credits: 0